Townhouse pick of the week

This Strivers' Row townhouse is on a corner lot and has parking for all your cars

The designated historic district is just two blocks. 

Corcoran

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Houses on Strivers' Row in Harlem don't come up for sale that often, in part because there's limited inventory. The two-block area of turn-of-the-last-century buildings got its name in the 1920s, when resourceful owners took in tenants to help cover expenses. With an asking price of $4,175,000, it's safe to say that 218 West 139th St. isn't really for strivers anymore, but for people who are doing pretty well. Still, there is a one-bedroom, floor-though apartment to bring in income. 

The 20-foot-wide townhouse is located on a corner lot and has south, north, and western exposures. Designed in 1893 by celebrated architects Bruce Price and Clarence S. Luce, the building has a distinct facade of yellow brick and white limestone terracotta. The lot itself is 32 feet by 100 feet, and the townhouse provides 4,500 square feet of space overall. 

Many of the 19th century details remain, including French doors, oak floors, crown moldings, six decorative fireplaces, and 12-foot ceilings; there's also a north-facing Juliet balcony. 

The owner's triplex has four bedrooms—which are very large, accommodating not one, but two beds—and two bathrooms, although the bathrooms aren't pictured. Neither is the kitchen, which makes us think it needs work.

The kitchen in the rental unit looks recently updated.  Other nice features include laundry facilities, walk-in closets, and storage space. 

If you have a car, or lots of cars, you'll love this place: it's got a private garage and a three-car driveway. (We're wondering if that green space pictured is the driveway.)

The townhouse is three blocks from the A, C, and B trains at 135th Street, and five blocks to the 2 and 3 at 135th Street. City College and St. Nicholas Park are to the west, playgrounds are nearby, and shopping and dining options can be found along Malcolm X Boulevard; 125th Street is a center of commerce and culture for the ara with the Apollo Theater, The Studio Museum of Harlem, an AMC Movie Theater, Whole Foods and more.