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8 places to donate today to help out your fellow New Yorkers

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After a tumultuous election this week, many New Yorkers are casting about for ways to make a difference, and to spread some good in the world.

If you're interested in donating to organizations fighting for civil rights, the environment, reproductive rights, and more, Jezebel has an extensive roundup of options including the ACLU and Planned Parenthood. Fusion's Felix Salmon has also recommended taking the amount that your investments rose in value yesterday (because eventually, the market did go up), and donating that to one of these organizations.

Below, we've also rounded up some New York-centric options that will put your money toward helping our city's most vulnerable residents:

  • The Doe Fund: If you've ever seen the "men in blue" out and about working in New York, you know the Doe Fund, which provides homeless or formerly incarcerated men with job training and resources to successfully get back into the job market.
  • The Bowery Mission: Since 1879, the Bowery Mission has provided food, shelter and care to the city's homeless and hungry.
  • God's Love We Deliver: As the name implies, this organization delivers thousands of meals every day to people too sick to shop or cook for themselves.
  • City Harvest: This is one of the city's largest organizations focusing on hunger, and collects thousands of pounds of extra food to millions of New Yorkers every year.
  • Callen-Lorde: A community health center that provides low-cost services to LGBTQ New Yorkers.
  • Robin Hood: This is the city's largest poverty-fighting organization, and provides supports to services such as homeless shelters, schools, job training, and more.
  • Housing WorksIn addition to cash, Housing Works accepts books, clothes, and furniture, and works to provide support and medical services for New Yorkers living with HIV/AIDS.
  • The Audre Lorde Project: Founded in 1996, Audre Lorde focuses on social justice and community wellness for lesbian, gay, two-spirit, trans, and gender non-conforming people of color in the city.

 

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